Design & Best Practices: Part 1

Site: QSC
Course: Cinema 101 Training
Book: Design & Best Practices: Part 1
Printed by: Guest user
Date: Saturday, 13 April 2024, 2:19 AM

Description

Video Transcript

00:08
Today we're going to make you aware of some basic design guidelines and best practices when working  
00:13
with QSC cinema products. That goes for both commercial cinemas and systems installations  
00:20
that call for cinema-like experiences. Let's do it!
00:24
This training is for systems integrators and technicians with an interest in projects that require a basic level of cinema knowledge,
00:32
and also for cinema dealers who want a refresher. We'll go over room design and acoustics,
00:38
loudspeaker installation, aiming and wiring, room tuning and equalization, and then we'll break  
00:44
down the Best Practices of a 7.1 audio system design that uses Q-SYS as the audio processor.
00:52
The principles we'll cover today are not just for commercial, DCI-compliant, movie theaters.
00:57
They can also help optimize the sonic experience whenever it's used to support a visual experience,
01:03
from a university auditorium, a museum exhibit, or actually any multi-purpose venue where you want  
01:10
to create a cinema-like experience that has a produced, multi-channel sound source.
01:15
Throughout this course we're going to reference documents and charts that we might not cover in depth here but we've  
01:22
added them to the Links and Downloads section for your convenience. So whenever you see this icon  
01:28
just think of it as a special little surprise waiting for you to open and enjoy.
01:33
The primary difference between true Cinema applications and  almost any other type of project in the pro audio  
01:40
or AV world is the idea of translation. Translation of the artistic intent of the content creator.
01:47
With normal music recording, no consumer will ever hear the music the same way that it sounded  
01:52
when the recording was produced. The creator can't control where it will be listened to, what kind of  
01:58
equipment or settings they will use - there's just too many variables. But that's not the case with  
02:03
movie theaters. The function of a movie theater is to recreate what was heard on the dubbing stage  
02:10
when the film was mixed. We call this "translation". To assist with this process cinema standards have  
02:17
been developed over the course of the last 100 years or so by organizations like these,
02:22
that govern areas like loudspeaker selection and placement, installation practices,
02:28
sound pressure level targets, a very specific sound measurement process, and a well-defined acoustic environment designed to take the "room" out of the mix.
02:39
These same standards are also used to design the dub stages where films are mixed. The extent to which these standards are followed determines how close
02:49
the translation is. So what exactly is good cinema sound? And why is it so important?
02:55
Well, we've already covered "Translation". Next is the removal of coloration of the sound source. The audio system should be neutral, and the room should have as little
03:06
impact on what we hear in the audience as possible. Dialogue is king - if the actor's voice is not crystal clear, you've missed the mark.
03:15
Even and balanced coverage is critical. Everyone pays the same price so everyone should get  
03:21
the same experience right? And finally never ever distract the audience's attention from the screen.
03:27
This means that the sound should be localized to the image on the screen, and there should be no  
03:33
audible echoes, or rattles and noises in the room. The whole point is to not break from the illusion.  
03:40
So how do we get "the best sound system" for an application? We start with the room itself,
03:46
the sound system design and the components of the system, and the system installation.
03:52
Getting any of these wrong can make the best gear in the world sound bad. But getting them all right will  
03:57
get you the best sounding audio system possible for a cinematic experience. First let's focus on  
04:04
the room. Good sound (and image for that matter) in any space starts with the Room. The size and shape  
04:11
of the room, and its acoustics are two of the most fundamental issues, and they're highly interrelated.
04:18
The length to width proportion has an effect on how reflected sound will sum or cancel in the room.
04:24
A room with equal proportions is probably the worst shape, followed closely by long, narrow rooms.  
04:31
For both acoustics and image, the best room proportions are between 1.2 to 1 up to 1.5  
04:38
to 1 length to width. For example, a minimum length for a room that's 30 feet wide would be 36 feet  
04:46
using the 1.2 to 1 ratio. The optimal ceiling height is defined by the length to width ratio,
04:53
according to this diagram. Based on this chart a room that has a ceiling height of around 19 and  
04:59
a half feet and is 30 feet wide would be in the ideal range. Of course sometimes you might not  
05:05
have any control over these dimensions, but if you understand that if the room doesn't fall within  
05:11
the sweet spot of this chart, you can at least have an informed conversation with your client.
05:17
All right let's take a break there, and come back when you're ready!

Lesson Description

Learn the differences between true Cinema and pro audio or AV applications.